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Vintage High School Vinyl LP Album Transferred to CD

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August 19, 2009 by admin

Many times when people want their legacy vinyl LP albums transferred to compact optical disk (CD) we find that they are already available commercially. These would include all of the fabulous 50 artists such as The Beatles, The Beach Boys, Gene Pitney, Frankie Avalon, and many more. Commercial entities able to sell these at a price significantly less than what we would have to charge to transfer to CD, anyhow. However, there are many of the legacy vinyl LP 33 rpm albums from the 1950s, ’60, and even ‘70s that are not available anywhere on CD. This is especially true for the case of private label albums such as high school productions.

Many of us are old enough to remember the quality even brand new LP albums had. The true audiophile of 1970 would spend thousands of 1970 dollars to get sound quality close to what we think nothing of today coming from a CD. The average teenie-bopper, however, only had access to far less quality playing hardware which nonetheless produced impressive audio but wore the vinyl. After a few playings, scratches began to be heard and as the vinyl aged the listener could detect hiss and objectionable scratches.

In addition to simply transferring the audio of a vintage LP album to CD, we can also do audio restoration for an additional nominal fee. Any LP album surviving multiple decades is certain to have scratches, clicks, pops, and lots of crackle. In many cases our restoration lowers the presence of these to the point where the average listener will not be able to detect them at all though results are not always the same.

We present here an example of the results from transferring legacy LP vinyl (50 year vintage) to CD with audio restoration. In 1959 and 1960 the Thomas M. Cooley high school in Detroit, Michigan produced three LP albums recording student festival productions. As you listen to samples of music extracted and restored from the vinyl, pay close attention to any sign of scratches, hiss, or rumble. It is not uncommon to achieve this level of success with our audio restoration.

If you are a Thomas M. Cooley High School alumnus (especially from 1959 and 1960) and would like to purchase any of these CDs, they are available at $32.50 each +tax plus $5.00 S&H. To order please call (734) 834-1700 or eMail info@wcardone.com and say you would like to order one or more of the three Cooley High CDs.  Personal checks, MasterCard, Visa, and American Express are accepted. Pay when you take delivery.


3 comments »

  1. Carol (Staufenbeil) Pettipher says:

    WOW!!! You made my day! After a great reunion, we now have available our incredible concert music to reminisce. My vinyl albums were packed away so well that after two moves across the country I can’t find them (though they may still be on our premises!). I had been planning on taking them to a studio to have them transferred to CD’s…thank you for doing that job for me….and the quality is truly amazing. The best part is recallling the words to many and singing along with them. Those were the days…our fantastic music department and dedicated talented instructors…we were SO fortunate!

  2. admin says:

    It truly is incredible what technology allows us to do. What is more… we can still take it one step further: In a live performance such as this, recorded before a live auditorium audience, there will be occasional noise from the audience. Such will typically include a cough here and there. We have the capability to edit out such noises.

  3. Kathy Holmes says:

    That was too good Cooley! Michigan excels in music. It’s important to preserve it. I lost my album from Tappan Jr. High in Ann Arbor for the 1967-68 school year. Has someone had one of those fine CD’s made of that? Could they? I don’t know who has one. I haven’t lived in Ann Arbor for 40 years. I don’t remember any of the kids names that were in the orchestra. When I left Ann Arbor I went from a Jr. High Varsity Orchestra of 50, to a high school orchestra of 6. (4 violins, 1 viola and a borrowed cello player from college.)

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